Tag Archives: feedback

Critiquing an Abstract

11 Mar

 Recent national and regional research into the distribution of Paleoindian projectile points has produced some initial patterning data. However, there is still much to be discovered related to distributions and criticisms include a lack of data from certain counties and a failure to collect data from non-academic sources. Data will be compiled by utilizing state records of sites with Paleoindian components, gathering data from landowners and artifact collectors, and adding it to the known academic publications on Paleoindian projectile point distributions in Allegan, Kent, and Ottawa Counties of Michigan. Through this, a comprehensive database of these artifacts and a distributional map will created and analyzed for patterning and statistical probabilities of the locations of further sites will be generated. These tools will be a valuable resource for future inquiries into Paleoindian settlement and adaptive strategies as well as locating new sites with which more information can be gathered to further understand the Paleoindian period in Michigan.
Word Count: 156 / Word Limit: 300

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What do you understand about the above statement, what do you absolutely not understand, and what do you think could be made more clear?

I’m gonna break this down now to explain it. A self-critique of my own abstract if you will. I hope to be able to flesh this out to make it understandable to many people without intrinsic knowledge of the subject matter.

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Recent national and regional research into the distribution of Paleoindian projectile points has produced some initial patterning data.

There have been recent studies at the regional and national levels to show how the earliest inhabitants of the Americas, also known as Paleoindians, were distributed across the land by looking at the distribution of diagnostic styles of projectile points.

However, there is still much to be discovered related to distributions and criticisms include a lack of data from certain counties and a failure to collect data from non-academic sources.

However, there is still much to be discovered related to Paleoindian distributions because current studies are largely incomplete due to a lack of data from certain states and counties  long with a wider ranges of sources for the data needs to be considered.

Data will be compiled by utilizing the resource of state records of sites with Paleoindian components, gathering data from landowners and artifact collectors, and adding it to the known academic publications on Paleoindian projectile point distributions in Allegan, Kent, and Ottawa Counties of Michigan.

The study area will be the Allegan, Kent, and Ottawa Counties of Michigan.  Paleoindian distribution will be compiled by utilizing known academic publications on Paleoindian projectile points and State of Michigan records of sites with Paleoindian period components that may or may not have been studied and published.  Landowners, artifact collectors, and historical societies are a relatively untapped resource and will be the most important in discovering the patterns of Paleoindian land use for the study area.

Through this, a comprehensive database of these artifacts and a distributional map will created and analyzed for patterning and statistical probabilities of the locations of further sites will be generated.

Through these methods, it will be possible to establish a comprehensive database of known locations of Paleoindian projectile point discoveries in these three counties.   Futhermore, a distributional map of the find locations for artifacts will be created and compared to known sites.  Statistical probabilities for further sites can be generated with these data.

These tools will be a valuable resource for future inquiries into Paleoindian settlement and adaptive strategies as well as locating new sites with which more information can be gathered to further understand the Paleoindian period in Michigan.

More information can be gathered beyond this study to even further understand the Paleoindian period in Michigan. These tools will a valuable resource for future inquiries into Paleoindian settlement and adaptive strategies.  They can also be used to identify new sites and better understand where probable sites are located.

Overall, the new abstract comes to 262 words, with which I am much more pleased.  I also feel it is much more descriptive and explanatory.  Though really, this is just me.  I would appreciate any feedback.  (Also, a few minor touch-ups were made on this final one with word use, etc. as I fit it all together.

– – – – –

There have been recent studies at the regional and national levels to show how the earliest inhabitants of the Americas, also known as Paleoindians, were spread across the land by looking at the distribution of diagnostic styles of projectile points. However, there is still much to be discovered related to Paleoindian distributions because current studies are largely incomplete due to a lack of data from certain states and counties long with a wider ranges of sources for the data needs to be considered. The study area will be the Allegan, Kent, and Ottawa Counties of Michigan. Paleoindian distribution will be compiled by utilizing known academic publications on Paleoindian projectile points and State of Michigan records of sites with Paleoindian period components that may or may not have been studied and published. Landowners, artifact collectors, and historical societies are a relatively untapped resource and will be the most important in discovering the patterns of Paleoindian land use for the study area. Through these methods, it will be possible to establish a comprehensive database of known locations of Paleoindian projectile point discoveries in these three counties. Futhermore, a distributional map of the find locations for artifacts will be created and compared to known sites. Statistical probabilities for further sites can be generated with these data. More information can be gathered beyond this study to even further understand the Paleoindian period in Michigan. These tools will a valuable resource for future inquiries into Paleoindian settlement and adaptive strategies. They can also be used to identify new sites and better understand where probable sites are located.